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Why Methylation Matters: Part 2

Why Methylation Matters: Part 2

In Part 1 of Why Methylation Matters, Dr. Erin Stokes discussed what methylation means, and why it matters when it comes to selecting your vitamins. With 30% of the population unable to convert certain B vitamins into the form their body needs, it makes sense to offer them in their active state, so that everyone, regardless of whether they fall into that 30% or not - can benefit from them!

For that reason, MegaFood has introduced two new products to the lineup: Methyl B12 and Adult B-Centered. Both of these new B vitamin formulations contain methylated forms of folate and B12, as well as the active form of Vitamin B6. As for what makes each product unique, let's break down the differences:

Methyl B12

MethylB12_60Methyl B12 is a convenient one-a-day, easy-to-swallow mini tablet designed to support energy production*,  health of brain cells & nerve tissues,* and the formation of healthy blood cells,* as well as support heart health by maintaining healthy levels of homocysteine.* So much support in such a small tablet! Methyl B12 is also great for those following vegetarian or vegan lifestyles, who do not get B12 naturally in their diets.

In addition to B12 and its support team of folate and B6, Methyl B12 also features beets from our amazing Farm Partner Stahlbush Island Farms. Stahlbush is renowned for their innovation in sustainable farming, and has been committed to environmentally friendly farming and food processing since they began in 1985.

“Why beets?” you might ask. Beets are one of the richest natural food sources of methyl donors that enhance the utilization of Vitamin B12 and red blood cell production. (1)* The WholeState® Beet Root found in our products is crafted using our one-of-a-kind Slo-Food Process to preserve the beneficial phytonutrients beets offer.

Adult B-Centered

Adult BCentered_60Next up is Adult B-Centered.  In addition to a full profile of B vitamins to support energy production and nervous system health, this formula features botanicals and other ingredients to support focus and cognitive function.* What could be better in our “wired and tired” culture?

While Adult B-Centered boasts the active and methylated B vitamin forms, the botanicals are where it really shines.  Bacopa supports cognitive function - including memory and learning capacity - as well as the body’s response to stress.* L-Theanine, an amino acid most commonly found in green tea, is shown in studies to help promote a sense of relaxation while maintaining alertness.* It also may help to encourage relaxation, focus and cognitive function.* Lastly, Lemon Balm, commonly referred to as the “gladdening” herb due to it’s comforting properties, is traditionally used to soothe occasional restlessness.*

Together, these ingredients look to support mental focus, while addressing some of the underlying causes of diminished cognition- namely, stress.*

As if that were not enough, this formula also features our Farm Partner Lundberg Family Farms! The brown rice used to deliver a number of the B vitamins found in this formula comes exclusively from this fourth-generation farm located in Richvale, California. When the farm began in 1937, the Lundbergs had one big intention: to leave the land better than they found it. This mission still guides them today!

Grab Life by the Bs

So, whether you’re looking to supplement your B12 due to dietary needs or energy concerns, or want to support your focus and mental clarity without reaching for another mid-day cup of coffee, these two new methylated B vitamin formulas are here to support you.* It doesn’t matter if you’re a methylating rockstar, or need a little help from your friends, the active B forms - MegaFood’s got your back!


References:

1) Lansley, K. E., P. G. Winyard, J. Fulford, A. Vanhatalo, S. J. Bailey, J. R. Blackwell, F. J. Dimenna, M. Gilchrist, N. Benjamin, and A. M. Jones. "Dietary Nitrate Supplementation Reduces the O2 Cost of Walking and Running: A Placebo-controlled Study." Journal of Applied Physiology 110.3 (2011): 591-600. Print.